Archive for the ‘new media art’ Category

Interactive Screen 0.7: user-friendly is not enough

August 1, 2007

I’ve been asked to give a keynote address on the first day of the Banff New Media Institute‘s annual workshop “Interactive Screen“. The theme this year is “user-friendly is not enough!” and looks at web 2.0 and artist-run initiatives in creating interactive rich media content and platforms. I will be talking about My Own Private Reality and outlining some of the history of artists (unpopular professionals?) situating their work in relation to (amateur?) popular culture online. Check back for documentation! (Sarah Cook)

Talking about the exhibition on Art Radio in Venice this week

June 6, 2007

We’ve been invited to participate in a round-table discussion about new media art on WPS1 Art Radio at the Venice Biennial this week, thanks to the PAN | Palazzo delle Arti Napoli. Listen out for us online on Saturday the 9th of June between 3 and 4pm (localtime), talking with Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Eva and Franco Mattes of 0100101110101101.org, and the critic Domenico Quaranta. If you are near the Giardini, look out for the radio boat docked nearby and say hello!

upcoming conference on web 2.0 technologies

May 16, 2007

re-posted from the SPECTRE list – This conference is in Amsterdam on the 30th and 31st of May.

Virtueel Platform invites you to attend the international conference
Cultuur 2.0. The conference examines the impact of a series of
developments known commonly as Web 2.0, including sharing, ranking,
rating, collective intelligence, the wisdom & the dumbness of crowds,
empowering software, social software, community applications.

The conference brings together the cultural sector and the online and
ICT world to share, develop and learn to use knowledge, ideas and
technology. Will a Web 2.0 approach really bring about new kinds of
cultural content or is this merely a question of a temporary hype?

Cultuur 2.0 is made up of two days. The first takes the form of a seminar, in which the Web 2.0 way of thinking is taken apart,
questioned and applied to the current cultural climate and policy
development. To assist us on this journey will be international
speakers including Charles Leadbeater
(http://www.charlesleadbeater.net), author of the forthcoming ‘We
Think, the power of mass creativity’, Internet pioneer Bob Stumpel
(http://www.result.com), Internet entrepreneur Boris Veldhuijzen van
Zanten (http://www.fleck.com) and Andrew Keen
(http://www.aftertv.com) who will be joining in via ‘video
conversation’. In addition a number of ministers from the former
‘Kabinet Online’ will debate on Professional versus Amateur
curatorship/publishing.

The second day of the Cultuur 2.0 conference on Thursday 31st of May
will be held in the form of a LAb.

In every Scenario LAb representatives of Web 2.0 and the Art/Cultural
sector will collide, work together, learn or maybe even melt together
as one.
The scenarios are: ‘Canon 2.0’ with the Rijksmuseum as a stakeholder,
‘Broadcasting 2.0’ with the VPRO, ‘Funds 2.0’ with Digital Pioneers,
and ‘Film 2.0′ with NFTVM. In addition there will also be an open
Scenario:’Lab 2.! 0©—’ lead by Willem Velthoven (Mediamatic). Guests
for this day are requested by invitation only.

A small exhibition has been put together showing examples of Cultuur
2.0 applications and cross-overs that coincide with the conference.

You will find more information on the programme here:
http://www.virtueelplatform.nl/artefact-3526-en.html


You can read news on the conference on our blog:
http://www.cultuur2punt0.nl

Registration for the first day via:
http://www.virtueelplatform.nl/registrationform

Fee: ¤ 75,- euro
Would you like to know more?
Please send an e-mail to Leonieke@virtueelplatform.nl or call
Virtueel Platform: 0031 20 6273758

This conference has been made possible by the Creative Challenge Call.

Virtueel Platform
Keizersgracht 264
1016 EV
Amsterdam
Nederland
Email: asta@virtueelplatform.nl

Curatorial Statement

May 5, 2007

German follows English. This is a placeholder/abbreviated version.

“Audiences increasingly share control of the creation of information through the act of reception. Data can be configured in many ways, but only that embraced by audiences will determine the value of any exchange of data (and in this process, the creation of information). This can be the creation of art.” – Tom Sherman*

My Own Private Reality is a playful look at the hype surrounding what is called Web 2.0 – the proliferation of publicly accessible websites which allow communities of users to create and share content (writing, photos, videos, music, etc.) – something that previously was only done by professionals, self-taught enthusiasts, or organisations with staff members with technical and software know-how. With blogs, wikis, and centralised file-sharing sites, first-time users can now be as productive as the well-paid experts. How artists play in the online spaces between those populated by unpopular amateurs and well-known professionals is at the heart of this exhibition.

„Das Publikum nimmt wachsenden Anteil an der Hervorbringung von Information allein durch die Beachtung, die sie ihr zukommen lässt. Daten können auf viele Arten konfiguriert werden, aber nur diejenigen, die von einer Öffentlichkeit angenommen werden, bestimmen den Wert eines jeglichen Datenaustauschs (und damit die Schaffung von Information). Das kann die Schöpfung von Kunst sein.“ – Tom Sherman*

My Own Private Reality wirft einen spielerischen Blick auf den Wirbel um das Web 2.0 – die weite Verbreitung von öffentlich zugänglichen Internetseiten, die Gemeinschaften von Nutzern erlauben, Inhalte wie Texte, Fotos, Videos oder Musik bereit zu stellen und auszutauschen. Das war zuvor nur Profis, selbst angelernten Enthusiasten oder dem Personal zentralisierter Organisationen mit den entsprechenden technischen und Programmkenntnissen möglich. Mit so genannten „blogs“, „wikis“, und „file-sharing sites“ können heutzutage auch Internetneulinge genauso produktiv sein wie gut bezahlte Experten. Wie Künstler diese virtuellen Orte im Internet nutzen und bespielen, die von unbekannten Amateuren und namhaften Profis bevölkert werden, steht im Zentrum der Ausstellung.

*Tom Sherman, “Flying in the face of Abundance and Redundance”, Canadian Art, Summer 2006. Vol. 23, no. 2.